Home » Late Roman Military: Late Roman Military Ranks, Late Roman Military Units, Saxon Shore, Foederati, Late Roman Army, Cataphract, Laeti, Taif by Source Wikipedia
Late Roman Military: Late Roman Military Ranks, Late Roman Military Units, Saxon Shore, Foederati, Late Roman Army, Cataphract, Laeti, Taif Source Wikipedia

Late Roman Military: Late Roman Military Ranks, Late Roman Military Units, Saxon Shore, Foederati, Late Roman Army, Cataphract, Laeti, Taif

Source Wikipedia

Published August 19th 2011
ISBN : 9781233127436
Paperback
34 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 33. Chapters: Late Roman military ranks, Late Roman military units, Saxon Shore, Foederati, Late Roman army,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 33. Chapters: Late Roman military ranks, Late Roman military units, Saxon Shore, Foederati, Late Roman army, Cataphract, Laeti, Taifals, East Roman army, Scholae Palatinae, Magister militum, Excubitors, Notitia Dignitatum, Limitanei, Primicerius, Equites cataphractarii, Portus Lemanis, Regulbium, Branodunum, Clibanarii, Tanukhids, Othona, Comes Britanniarum, Count of the Saxon Shore, Bucellarius, Palatini, Areani, Dux Britanniarum, Dromedarii, Pseudocomitatenses. Excerpt: The Late Roman army is the term used to denote the military forces of the Roman Empire from the accession of Emperor Diocletian in 284 until the Empires definitive division into Eastern and Western halves in 395. A few decades afterwards, the Western army disintegrated as the Western empire collapsed. The East Roman army, on the other hand, continued intact and essentially unchanged until its reorganization by themes and transformation into the Byzantine army in the 7th century. The term late Roman army is often used to include the East Roman army. The army of the Principate underwent a significant transformation as a result of the chaotic 3rd century. Unlike the Principate army, the army of the 4th century was heavily dependent on conscription and its soldiers were more poorly remunerated than in the 2nd century. Barbarians from outside the empire probably supplied a much larger proportion of the late armys recruits than in the army of the 1st and 2nd centuries, but there is little evidence that this affected performance. The army of the 4th century was probably no larger than that of the 2nd. The main change in structure was the establishment of large armies that accompanied the emperors (comitatus praesentales) and were generally based away from the frontiers. Their primary function was to deter usurpations. The legions were split up into smaller units co...